FacebookTwitterLinkedin

Safety

Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

By on Feb 8, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

It may be time to revisit your concealed carry policies at your workplace. Back in late December 2016, Senate Bill 199 proposed amendments to Ohio law to expand the area so that an individual with a valid concealed handgun license can possess a firearm in a privately-owned vehicle while parked on company property. To ensure you are in compliance with these new provisions, consider the following guidelines for what is and is not permitted while on company property: With the proper signage, businesses and property owners in general can prohibit firearms within the workplace and on their property. However, they cannot prohibit an employee or guest with a valid concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm and ammunition in his or her personal vehicle on the premises where the vehicle is permitted to be, such as a parking lot. If the individual is outside of the vehicle, the firearm and ammunition must be locked in a trunk, glove box, or other enclosed compartment within or on the vehicle. An employee may not possess a firearm or ammunition in a company-owned or company-leased vehicle where the employer prohibits such possession. Although businesses and property owners cannot prohibit a license holder from possessing or storing a firearm in his or her privately owned vehicle while parked on their premises, they can post a sign in a conspicuous location on the land or premises prohibiting people, including individuals with a valid concealed handgun license, from carrying firearms on or onto that land or in the premises. Provisions will go into effect on March 21, 2017, which means company policies and procedures will need to be updated to reflect these changes. Do you have questions about your concealed carry policies or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

Read More
Completing the OSHA Form 300

Completing the OSHA Form 300

By on Feb 6, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

On February 1st of each year, most employers are required to have completed and posted the OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses in their workplace.  The OSHA 300 Log remains posted through April 30th. The OSHA Form 300 Log is used to record work-related injuries and illnesses and classifies the extent and severity of each case.  This information is important for employers, workers and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards. For your convenience, OSHA has also created a booklet to help you complete and maintain your OSHA Form 300.The booklet contains: An overview of recording work-related injuries and illnesses, which includes information on when an injury or illness is considered work-related, which work-related injuries and illnesses should you record, and any additional criteria. Definitions of terminology used within the form. How to classify illnesses. When you need to post the summary and for how long you need to keep it on file. How to calculate injury and illness incidence rates. Step-by-step instructions on filling out the log and summary. For complete information on completing the OSHA Form 300, visit the OSHA website for a comprehensive booklet with instructions on filling out the form. Do you have questions about the OSHA Form 300 or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

Read More
What to include in your holiday party memo

What to include in your holiday party memo

By on Dec 5, 2016 in Blog, Communication, Safety | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should drink responsibly if alcoholic beverages will be served at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your employees...

Read More
Don’t forget to post your OSHA Form 300A!

Don’t forget to post your OSHA Form 300A!

By on Jan 29, 2016 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

From February 1st to April 30th of each year, required employers must complete and post the OSHA Form 300/300A Log and Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses in their workplace. Employers that are required to complete this each year include any employer with more than ten employees and whose establishments are not classified as a partially exempt industry. Partially exempt industries include establishments in specific low hazard retail, service, finance, insurance, or real estate industries. For a complete list of partially exempt industries, go to https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/ppt1/RK1exempttable.html. Employers who are required to keep Form 300, the Injury and Illness log, must post Form 300A, the Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, in their workplace every year from February 1 to April 30. Current and former employees, or their representatives, have the right to access injury and illness records. Employers must give the requester a copy of the relevant record(s) by the end of the next business day. For your convenience, OSHA has also created a booklet to help you complete and maintain your OSHA Form 300 [https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/new-osha300form1-1-04.pdf].The booklet contains: An overview of recording work-related injuries and illnesses, which includes information on when an injury or illness is considered work-related, which work-related injuries and illnesses should you record, and any additional criteria. Definitions of terminology used within the form. How to classify illnesses. When you need to post the summary and for how long you need to keep it on file. How to calculate injury and illness incidence rates. Step-by-step instructions on filling out the log and summary. For more information on OSHA recordkeeping and reporting requirements, read more at https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/index.html. If you need help determining if you are required to complete OSHA Form 300 or have questions on completing the forms, Organizational Architecture can provide guidance to ensure your organization is in compliance by meeting all reporting requirements regarding work-related injuries and illnesses. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

Read More
What to include in your holiday party memo

What to include in your holiday party memo

By on Dec 15, 2015 in Blog, Safety, Supervision | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a holiday party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should not over indulge in alcoholic beverages while at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive, or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your...

Read More
Workplace accidents: common causes and consequences

Workplace accidents: common causes and consequences

By on Jun 17, 2015 in Blog, Safety, Training and Development | 0 comments

Workplace accidents can be costly no matter how minor they may be. When safety procedures are not followed and accidents occur, the financial impact to your organization can be staggering. Workplace accidents are generally classified as either employee or customer. Some of the consequences of employee accidents include: Personal hardships [pain and suffering] Loss of work Reduced productivity Poor employee morale Increased unnecessary costs to the organization [medical expenses, increased worker’s compensations, and increased insurance premiums] Some consequences associated with customer accidents include: Poor company reputation Decreased customer satisfaction Reduced repeat business and referrals Potential litigation. Over 90% of workplace accidents are caused by unsafe acts or conditions. The most common causes of injury to employees and customers include: Improper handling of objects [lifting, pushing, pulling, etc.] Falls [standing in chairs, wet floors, tripping over objects, poor housekeeping, etc.] Struck by falling objects [items from shelves, hangers on the wall, etc.] Running into objects [boxes, furniture, equipment, glass windows, etc.] Improper body movement [stooping, bending, twisting, etc.] Contact with electricity In order to control accidents, you must be able to recognize unsafe acts and conditions and understand the appropriate action needed to eliminate the hazard. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

Read More