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Training and Development

Adult learning styles

Adult learning styles

By on Mar 1, 2017 in Blog, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

The way in which adult learners process and remember new information can vary. Whether formal or informal, the primary learning styles should be considered. The four styles are: Observation – finds the learner performing tasks after they have observed the complete task being performed by another employee. Role modeling is an example of this style of learning. The manager or an experienced employee demonstrates the proper way to complete a task, explaining throughout the demonstration. Participation – involves the learner from the beginning; they actually perform the new tasks with the supervision. Role playing is an example of this style learning. The employee participates in a scenario appropriate for the task being learned. The learner attempts to demonstrate proper behavior as they go through the steps required to complete a task. Listening – when the learner listens to an explanation of how the new tasks is to be performed. In addition, listening frequently occurs when a learner overhears another employee complete a task. Relying heavily on their sense of hearing, they process the information and physically perform the task afterward. Reading – involves the learner and some sort of printed material. Instructions are read, and then the task is performed upon completion of the materials. Effective training programs frequently use all styles to ensure each attendee will be provided with their own individual learning advantage. When a program is based on only on learning style, some attendees may be at a disadvantage. Do you have questions on adult learning principles or other training and development topics? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Understanding adult learning principles

Understanding adult learning principles

By on Feb 27, 2017 in Blog, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

Having knowledge of how adults learn will assist you in becoming a better trainer. Although you may have preconceived notions about specific learners, most adults bring similar perceptions to a training session. The following statements are relevant to the adult learning process: Adults bring considerable experience with them – they wish to speak, participate, and contribute; they dislike lectures; they desire to maintain self-esteem. Adults have a “here-and-now” viewpoint – they want to focus on current issues, not so much on material that may be useful in the future. Adults are accustomed to being active – they become restless if their time is being wasted; they prefer to be involved in activities. Adults are accustomed to being self-directing – they want the instructor to provide involvement, rather than be too directive. For training to be effective, the training must acknowledge and accommodate certain principles when presenting to adult learners. To ensure success: Involve your attendees in the learning process and allowing them to talk about themselves, as appropriate, to apply the learning content. Allow trainees to learn by doing. Have trainees apply and practice learned skills in the learning environment. Help trainees draw their own conclusions. Avoid telling trainees all of the answers. Do you have questions on adult learning principles or other training and development topics? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

By on Feb 8, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

It may be time to revisit your concealed carry policies at your workplace. Back in late December 2016, Senate Bill 199 proposed amendments to Ohio law to expand the area so that an individual with a valid concealed handgun license can possess a firearm in a privately-owned vehicle while parked on company property. To ensure you are in compliance with these new provisions, consider the following guidelines for what is and is not permitted while on company property: With the proper signage, businesses and property owners in general can prohibit firearms within the workplace and on their property. However, they cannot prohibit an employee or guest with a valid concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm and ammunition in his or her personal vehicle on the premises where the vehicle is permitted to be, such as a parking lot. If the individual is outside of the vehicle, the firearm and ammunition must be locked in a trunk, glove box, or other enclosed compartment within or on the vehicle. An employee may not possess a firearm or ammunition in a company-owned or company-leased vehicle where the employer prohibits such possession. Although businesses and property owners cannot prohibit a license holder from possessing or storing a firearm in his or her privately owned vehicle while parked on their premises, they can post a sign in a conspicuous location on the land or premises prohibiting people, including individuals with a valid concealed handgun license, from carrying firearms on or onto that land or in the premises. Provisions will go into effect on March 21, 2017, which means company policies and procedures will need to be updated to reflect these changes. Do you have questions about your concealed carry policies or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Completing the OSHA Form 300

Completing the OSHA Form 300

By on Feb 6, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

On February 1st of each year, most employers are required to have completed and posted the OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses in their workplace.  The OSHA 300 Log remains posted through April 30th. The OSHA Form 300 Log is used to record work-related injuries and illnesses and classifies the extent and severity of each case.  This information is important for employers, workers and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards. For your convenience, OSHA has also created a booklet to help you complete and maintain your OSHA Form 300.The booklet contains: An overview of recording work-related injuries and illnesses, which includes information on when an injury or illness is considered work-related, which work-related injuries and illnesses should you record, and any additional criteria. Definitions of terminology used within the form. How to classify illnesses. When you need to post the summary and for how long you need to keep it on file. How to calculate injury and illness incidence rates. Step-by-step instructions on filling out the log and summary. For complete information on completing the OSHA Form 300, visit the OSHA website for a comprehensive booklet with instructions on filling out the form. Do you have questions about the OSHA Form 300 or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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What to include in your holiday party memo

What to include in your holiday party memo

By on Dec 5, 2016 in Blog, Communication, Safety | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should drink responsibly if alcoholic beverages will be served at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your employees...

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Client success story – City of Strongsville

Client success story – City of Strongsville

By on Jul 20, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Government and Public Sector, Success Stories, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

An example of how Organizational Architecture assists its client with leadership development is our recent work with the City of Strongsville and its leadership development program. The City of Strongsville is a large suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. Not only does it have a larger population than other suburbs, it has a diverse mix of residential housing and businesses and attracts thousands of visitors each day who enjoy its amenities. Steve Kilo, Director of Human Resources for the City, said, “Our Mayor feels that one of our most effective advantages as a City is the quality of our departmental leadership. He has led our efforts to foster teamwork, break down barriers, and provide the tools our leaders need to be good stewards of the public’s trust. “Organizational Architecture has helped us over the years with tools to enhance our leadership skills.  Workshops on Communication Styles, Change Management, Accountability, Coaching and Conflict Resolution, and others, have made our department heads and their assistants better at leading their people.  They have had a big impact on how we lead, how we coach, and how we responsibly manage the City’s resources”. Cities have unique challenges. As we are able to do for our business and not-for-profit clients, Organizational Architecture can be your partner to help your Directors, Assistant Directors, Supervisors, and other management personnel be successful and effective leaders. Want to learn more?  Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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