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Training and Development

Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

Changes to Ohio’s concealed carry provisions

By on Feb 8, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

It may be time to revisit your concealed carry policies at your workplace. Back in late December 2016, Senate Bill 199 proposed amendments to Ohio law to expand the area so that an individual with a valid concealed handgun license can possess a firearm in a privately-owned vehicle while parked on company property. To ensure you are in compliance with these new provisions, consider the following guidelines for what is and is not permitted while on company property: With the proper signage, businesses and property owners in general can prohibit firearms within the workplace and on their property. However, they cannot prohibit an employee or guest with a valid concealed handgun license from transporting or storing a firearm and ammunition in his or her personal vehicle on the premises where the vehicle is permitted to be, such as a parking lot. If the individual is outside of the vehicle, the firearm and ammunition must be locked in a trunk, glove box, or other enclosed compartment within or on the vehicle. An employee may not possess a firearm or ammunition in a company-owned or company-leased vehicle where the employer prohibits such possession. Although businesses and property owners cannot prohibit a license holder from possessing or storing a firearm in his or her privately owned vehicle while parked on their premises, they can post a sign in a conspicuous location on the land or premises prohibiting people, including individuals with a valid concealed handgun license, from carrying firearms on or onto that land or in the premises. Provisions will go into effect on March 21, 2017, which means company policies and procedures will need to be updated to reflect these changes. Do you have questions about your concealed carry policies or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Completing the OSHA Form 300

Completing the OSHA Form 300

By on Feb 6, 2017 in Blog, Compliance, Safety | 0 comments

On February 1st of each year, most employers are required to have completed and posted the OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses in their workplace.  The OSHA 300 Log remains posted through April 30th. The OSHA Form 300 Log is used to record work-related injuries and illnesses and classifies the extent and severity of each case.  This information is important for employers, workers and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards. For your convenience, OSHA has also created a booklet to help you complete and maintain your OSHA Form 300.The booklet contains: An overview of recording work-related injuries and illnesses, which includes information on when an injury or illness is considered work-related, which work-related injuries and illnesses should you record, and any additional criteria. Definitions of terminology used within the form. How to classify illnesses. When you need to post the summary and for how long you need to keep it on file. How to calculate injury and illness incidence rates. Step-by-step instructions on filling out the log and summary. For complete information on completing the OSHA Form 300, visit the OSHA website for a comprehensive booklet with instructions on filling out the form. Do you have questions about the OSHA Form 300 or other compliance areas?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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What to include in your holiday party memo

What to include in your holiday party memo

By on Dec 5, 2016 in Blog, Communication, Safety | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should drink responsibly if alcoholic beverages will be served at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your employees...

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Client success story – City of Strongsville

Client success story – City of Strongsville

By on Jul 20, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Government and Public Sector, Success Stories, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

An example of how Organizational Architecture assists its client with leadership development is our recent work with the City of Strongsville and its leadership development program. The City of Strongsville is a large suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. Not only does it have a larger population than other suburbs, it has a diverse mix of residential housing and businesses and attracts thousands of visitors each day who enjoy its amenities. Steve Kilo, Director of Human Resources for the City, said, “Our Mayor feels that one of our most effective advantages as a City is the quality of our departmental leadership. He has led our efforts to foster teamwork, break down barriers, and provide the tools our leaders need to be good stewards of the public’s trust. “Organizational Architecture has helped us over the years with tools to enhance our leadership skills.  Workshops on Communication Styles, Change Management, Accountability, Coaching and Conflict Resolution, and others, have made our department heads and their assistants better at leading their people.  They have had a big impact on how we lead, how we coach, and how we responsibly manage the City’s resources”. Cities have unique challenges. As we are able to do for our business and not-for-profit clients, Organizational Architecture can be your partner to help your Directors, Assistant Directors, Supervisors, and other management personnel be successful and effective leaders. Want to learn more?  Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Client success story – leadership coaching, development, and training

Client success story – leadership coaching, development, and training

By on Jul 18, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Government and Public Sector, Success Stories, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

Today’s success story brings you to a vibrant suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. That’s right…Organizational Architecture even partners with municipalities to support their workforce strategy! We started working with this city’s leadership team to assist with on-going leadership development. Our initial assessment uncovered these challenges: The need for clarity around what characteristics are possessed by effective leaders The lack of meaningful and relevant training and development for their leadership team There was a need to foster teamwork among members of the leadership team. First, an assessment was conducted of the current managers to identify leadership potential and coaching and development needs. After identifying developmental areas of the city’s core competencies, we recommended training and development activities to meet these needs and created an action plan to deliver training workshops throughout the year. To fully commit managers to the training and development process, we also integrated the same competencies into their current performance management system including talent review and succession planning process. For the past five years, we have been able to provide customized leadership training and development to fit each department, while also targeting the specific competencies that have been deemed areas for improvement, ensuring that the entire city’s leadership team is provided a well-rounded training and development opportunity. Do you need assistance with designing a leadership training and development plan that works for your organization?  Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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The importance of resolving workplace conflict

The importance of resolving workplace conflict

By on Apr 11, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Supervision, Training and Development | 0 comments

It is generally assumed that employees conduct themselves in a professional manner in the workplace.  But, harmonious relationships don’t always exist, and occasionally a “difference of opinion” occurs, resulting in conflict. Here are some effects that can happen when conflict exists in the workplace: Productivity is hindered. Customer satisfaction is compromised. The atmosphere may be tense. An unpleasant environment is created. But conflict is reality. The issue is how to resolve conflict, because conflict can result in: Low productivity Absenteeism High employee turnover Theft Sabotage Litigation High insurance premiums It has been shown that 30% of a manager’s time in the workplace is spent resolving employee conflict. Valuable resources can be saved when a manager knows how to effectively control conflict. Overcoming employee conflict requires a high level of tact and diplomacy and may even necessitate: An intervention Ongoing negotiation Involving an external neutral party As with any performance or Human Resources related situation, a manager’s ability to achieve compromise and build a consensus with the parties involved is essential to an effective resolution. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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