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Coaching

Is coaching necessary? The results of failing to coach

Is coaching necessary? The results of failing to coach

By on Jun 26, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Training and Development | 0 comments

  Unsuccessful Managers believe that coaching employees is not necessary and expect their employees to “learn from experience”. Although exposure to new experiences creates an opportunity for learning, it is not regarded as the best teacher of new skills. To depend on experience alone might result in: Employees not learning the task correctly and becoming frustrated. Learning taking longer, due to “trial and error” or limited availability of appropriate learning opportunities. Being aware of the excuses that Managers frequently use to avoid coaching will enable you to avoid falling into a similar trap.  Managers who avoid coaching may tell you that: Time is not available. Coaching seems awkward. An employee will become overwhelmed. Initial goals were not established, and now it’s too late to coach. Employees can figure out job responsibilities on their own. Goals are obvious and employees should know how to achieve them. Employee development is unimportant. Employees get defensive when you discuss their performance. Any preconceived notions about coaching should be put aside to allow positive development of your coaching techniques. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Using coaching moments to your advantage

Using coaching moments to your advantage

By on Jun 24, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Training and Development | 0 comments

Research has shown that if you devote a minimum of 5% of your time and attention to ongoing coaching, you will have the foundation for a successful program within your organization.  You will be prepared, should any of the following coaching “moments” occur. If an employee requests help: Find out more before instinctively responding with a solution. Determine if the employee really wants permission, encouragement, or advice. Discuss what the employee is thinking, evaluate the pros and cons, consider their feedback, and offer solutions. Positively address small disappointments and: Do not “gloss over” an employee’s concern with failure. Express your support by listening to their feelings. Provide your assistance to help the employee gain a new perspective as to what happened and how to resolve it. Focus on successes by transferring the lessons learned to the next opportunity and celebrating their achievements. Reviewing the foundation of the success is essential so the employee can improve even further in the future. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Determining an appropriate coaching method

Determining an appropriate coaching method

By on Jun 3, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Training and Development | 0 comments

Choosing an appropriate method when coaching an employee will yield maximum results for the time invested.  The ability to anticipate employee reaction or their motives for behaviors demonstrated will help determine the best coaching approach. Select a coaching method that is appropriate for the need.  Consider that: Improving personal values or understanding a corporate change in philosophy is best accomplished through case studies or detailed conversations. Enhancing communication, selling skills, or interpersonal development is best accomplished through role-playing or hands-on demonstration and practice. Communicating marketing or business strategies is best accomplished through discussions or analysis of “real” examples. Improving employee understanding of fact-based information is best accomplished through classes, books/modules, on-the-job training, etc. Space practical application sessions out over time, because: Competency is rarely achieved in one session. New behaviors are best learned when acquired in smaller segments. Repetition and follow through are required to form new habits. Encourage your employees to experiment with newly gained knowledge because varying the application can help reveal which methods work best for them. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Workplace scenarios that may require coaching

Workplace scenarios that may require coaching

By on Jun 1, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Training and Development | 0 comments

Although the role of the coach is complex, there are guidelines that, when applied consistently, may streamline the overall coaching process. An awareness of common scenarios that may be present in your organization may provide an advantage when beginning or enhancing your coaching program. Coaching should be considered when: Conducting initial orientation and training of a new employee. Explaining company goals and expectations. Modification of performance is necessary. Company initiatives change. An employee is assigned a new responsibility. An employee wants to be a top performer and groomed for management. An employee’s self-confidence needs improving. Use every opportunity to practice and remember that the best coaches explain the “why” before the “what”. Frequent application of coaching techniques will result in a greater level of comfort within a shorter period of time. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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