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Client success story – City of Strongsville

Client success story – City of Strongsville

By on Jul 20, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Success Stories, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

An example of how Organizational Architecture assists its client with leadership development is our recent work with the City of Strongsville and its leadership development program. The City of Strongsville is a large suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. Not only does it have a larger population than other suburbs, it has a diverse mix of residential housing and businesses and attracts thousands of visitors each day who enjoy its amenities. Steve Kilo, Director of Human Resources for the City, said, “Our Mayor feels that one of our most effective advantages as a City is the quality of our departmental leadership. He has led our efforts to foster teamwork, break down barriers, and provide the tools our leaders need to be good stewards of the public’s trust. “Organizational Architecture has helped us over the years with tools to enhance our leadership skills.  Workshops on Communication Styles, Change Management, Accountability, Coaching and Conflict Resolution, and others, have made our department heads and their assistants better at leading their people.  They have had a big impact on how we lead, how we coach, and how we responsibly manage the City’s resources”. Cities have unique challenges. As we are able to do for our business and not-for-profit clients, Organizational Architecture can be your partner to help your Directors, Assistant Directors, Supervisors, and other management personnel be successful and effective leaders. Want to learn more?  Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Client success story – leadership coaching, development, and training

Client success story – leadership coaching, development, and training

By on Jul 18, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Success Stories, Training and Development, Training and Development Consulting | 0 comments

Today’s success story brings you to a vibrant suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. That’s right…Organizational Architecture even partners with municipalities to support their workforce strategy! We started working with this city’s leadership team to assist with on-going leadership development. Our initial assessment uncovered these challenges: The need for clarity around what characteristics are possessed by effective leaders The lack of meaningful and relevant training and development for their leadership team There was a need to foster teamwork among members of the leadership team. First, an assessment was conducted of the current managers to identify leadership potential and coaching and development needs. After identifying developmental areas of the city’s core competencies, we recommended training and development activities to meet these needs and created an action plan to deliver training workshops throughout the year. To fully commit managers to the training and development process, we also integrated the same competencies into their current performance management system including talent review and succession planning process. For the past five years, we have been able to provide customized leadership training and development to fit each department, while also targeting the specific competencies that have been deemed areas for improvement, ensuring that the entire city’s leadership team is provided a well-rounded training and development opportunity. Do you need assistance with designing a leadership training and development plan that works for your organization?  Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Defining the three phases of performance management: phase one – coaching

Defining the three phases of performance management: phase one – coaching

By on Mar 16, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management | 0 comments

Performance management provides a structured plan for developing, managing, and continuously improving employee performance. Accurate documentation, consistently maintained for each employee, tracks growth and development. To ensure that excellent product quality and service are consistently delivered, employees must be challenged not only to meet, but to exceed, company and position standards. Performance management offers three basic phases or stages for employee development: coaching, corrective action, and termination. The first phase, coaching, involves the process of orienting, training, and encouraging employees. During coaching, expectations and performance standards are outlined, both new and seasoned employees receive ongoing feedback regarding their performance, and employees are encouraged to challenge themselves to improve continuously. Effective coaching creates an environment that encourages rapid development of new job skills. Both you and the employee can benefit from coaching in the following ways: Employees receive proper training Duties involved in a new position are clearly outlined Employees have higher job satisfaction Turnover is reduced Coaching and motivation go hand-in-hand to generate continued improved performance. Tips for effective coaching and motivation include: Employees work harder for recognition than pay What gets measured, gets done Praise publicly and frequently Encourage role-playing of positive behaviors and skills Create an environment that seeks ideas and suggestions Encourage friendly competition Make work fun Satisfied employees work harder and produce more Whenever possible, it is always preferred to resolve performance issues and retain employees. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

By on Mar 14, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Supervision, Training and Development | 0 comments

The goal of an effective performance management program is to make the best even better. Prior to the implementation of any stage of performance management, it is important to understand if there are reasons behind an employee’s performance shortcomings. In some instances, there may be an obstacle preventing an employee from being successful. These obstacles may not be within their control. Consider these options as possible reasons for an employee to exhibit poor performance. If the employee says “I don’t know how to do this” – in this instance, the employee is unsure of the necessary steps for completion of a particular task. It could be due to the lack of training, poor quality of training, inadequate training, or poor employee comprehension or retention. This is a training concern and is your responsibility. Your training and coaching will help this employee learn the steps to perform tasks required for the job. If the employee says “Something is getting in my way” – in this instance, the employee is unable to complete a particular task. It could be because an obstacle is preventing them from completing the task. Potential obstacles could include the lack of proper tools or equipment, equipment that does not perform efficiently, or some other demands that interfere with completing the task. This is a supervisory concern. As the manager, your responsibility is to identify the barrier and remove it. If the employee says “I didn’t know these responsibilities were part of my job” – in this instance, the employee is unclear about their job duties. It might be because a thorough explanation of the position’s responsibilities was not provided. This is also a supervisory concern. As the manager, you are responsible for ensuring that employees understand their job responsibilities at the time of hire. If the employee says “I don’t want to do it” – in this instance, the employee demonstrates a lack of motivation regarding the job and has the necessary skills, yet chooses not to perform the required tasks. This is a corrective action concern. You should assess the employee’s motivation level and begin the appropriate steps to ensure improved performance. In each of the previous instances, a different course of action should be...

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Performance analysis quadrant at a glance

Performance analysis quadrant at a glance

By on Jul 22, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Training and Development | 1 comment

Now that the primary causes of poor performance have been identified, we can now address how to fix these problems. As you plot your employees along the quadrant, consider the following solutions to the performance problem it matches. Motivation [Quadrant A] If the employee has sufficient job knowledge, but does not have the proper attitude, a motivational problem may exist. Ensure the employee clearly understands the potential results of their actions. Resources [Quadrant B] If the employee has job knowledge and favorable attitude, but performance is not satisfactory, the problem source may be out of the employee’s control. The obstacle hindering performance should be corrected or removed. Selection [Quadrant C] If the employee is lacking in both job knowledge and favorable attitude, a problem with employee selection or promotion may be present. Reassignment or providing the opportunity to explore career paths elsewhere should be considered. Training [Quadrant D] If the employee desires to perform but lacks job knowledge, additional training must be provided. Consider skill development options. Please note that the resolution may not always be the same as the cause.  View the performance problem globally prior to determining a resolution action plan. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Identifying causes of poor performance

Identifying causes of poor performance

By on Jul 20, 2015 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Training and Development | 0 comments

In the process of identifying causes of poor employee performance, the Performance Analysis Quadrant is a highly regarded tool to assist managers in “visually” identifying causes of poor performance. Before beginning your quadrant, you must understand what may be causing an employee’s poor performance. The four primary causes of poor performance are: Motivation – The employee knows how to perform properly, but chooses not to [will level vs. skill level]. Resources – A lack of equipment or technology negatively hinders employee performance. Processes – Poor performance is caused by poor working conditions or bad procedures not controlled by the employee. Knowledge or skill set – The employee lacks the knowledge or skills to perform acceptably. Any employee who may have current or potential problems may be “plotted” on the Performance Analysis Quadrant.  Ask yourself “Does the employee have adequate job knowledge?” [Skill level] “Does the employee have the proper attitude/desire to perform?” [Will level] By assigning a numerical rating between one [low] and ten [high] for each answer, the employee will fall into one of the four quadrants, and the performance problem source will be accurately revealed. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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