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Defining the three phases of performance management: phase two – corrective action

Defining the three phases of performance management: phase two – corrective action

By on Apr 5, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Supervision | 0 comments

A few weeks ago, we shared some basics about managing poor performance and how to begin the process of addressing it through coaching. If an employee is still not meeting their position’s expectations after receiving training and coaching from their supervisor, it is time to move to the next step of performance management – corrective action. Corrective action is implemented when an employee has been properly and thoroughly trained, but is not performing according to company and position standards and guidelines. In this instance, it is your responsibility to: Uncover reasons for poor performance Inform the employee of low performance issues Provide guidance to improve the situation A verbal discussion or warning is the initial, informal meeting between you and the employee. A written corrective action calls for a more formal meeting between you and the employee, where pertinent information is documented on a permanent record. Regardless of the type of corrective action being administered, an action plan for problem resolution, with a corresponding time frame, should always be included. Set measurable goals and outcomes. Both you and the employee can benefit from effective corrective action, in that: Employees are made aware of substandard performance Employees are given an opportunity to improve Negative issues may be quickly resolved No surprises occur during the performance review Trust and concern for the employee is demonstrated by you If the employee’s performance has not reached expected standards, according to the action plan and time frame established in the previous corrective action session, it is time to take further action, which may include conducting a second written corrective action or discharging the employee. A second corrective action is the last opportunity for an employee to improve performance before a possible discharge. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

By on Mar 14, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Supervision, Training and Development | 0 comments

The goal of an effective performance management program is to make the best even better. Prior to the implementation of any stage of performance management, it is important to understand if there are reasons behind an employee’s performance shortcomings. In some instances, there may be an obstacle preventing an employee from being successful. These obstacles may not be within their control. Consider these options as possible reasons for an employee to exhibit poor performance. If the employee says “I don’t know how to do this” – in this instance, the employee is unsure of the necessary steps for completion of a particular task. It could be due to the lack of training, poor quality of training, inadequate training, or poor employee comprehension or retention. This is a training concern and is your responsibility. Your training and coaching will help this employee learn the steps to perform tasks required for the job. If the employee says “Something is getting in my way” – in this instance, the employee is unable to complete a particular task. It could be because an obstacle is preventing them from completing the task. Potential obstacles could include the lack of proper tools or equipment, equipment that does not perform efficiently, or some other demands that interfere with completing the task. This is a supervisory concern. As the manager, your responsibility is to identify the barrier and remove it. If the employee says “I didn’t know these responsibilities were part of my job” – in this instance, the employee is unclear about their job duties. It might be because a thorough explanation of the position’s responsibilities was not provided. This is also a supervisory concern. As the manager, you are responsible for ensuring that employees understand their job responsibilities at the time of hire. If the employee says “I don’t want to do it” – in this instance, the employee demonstrates a lack of motivation regarding the job and has the necessary skills, yet chooses not to perform the required tasks. This is a corrective action concern. You should assess the employee’s motivation level and begin the appropriate steps to ensure improved performance. In each of the previous instances, a different course of action should be...

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Developing your performance review

Developing your performance review

By on Jan 12, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Performance Review, Supervision | 0 comments

You may find yourself asking “Why is developing the performance review so significant?”. A performance review can easily have a long-term impact on your employees, so here are some factors to keep in mind when developing your performance review: Perception of job performance. Growth and development. Ability to be motivated to perform job requirements. Capability to be retained. Capacity to modify behavior to achieve desired business results. Salary increases. Future promotions. Careful development is crucial, as a poorly written performance review could result in serious long-term ramifications. Another important part of the performance review development process is your employee’s self-evaluation. The self-evaluation provides an opportunity for your employee to evaluate their performance from a personal perspective. A near consensus of the two review forms should exist if you have provided ongoing coaching and performance feedback throughout the review period. Should differences be anticipated, be prepared to discuss. Observe the following guidelines for effective self-evaluations: Allow sufficient preparation time for each performance review. Distribute a copy of the performance review to each employee before being reviewed. Explain the importance of the self-evaluation process to each employee. Define how performance is evaluated (i.e., exceeds, meets, does not meet expectations). Review performance review form completion steps with each employee. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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What to include in your holiday party memo

What to include in your holiday party memo

By on Dec 15, 2015 in Blog, Safety, Supervision | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a holiday party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should not over indulge in alcoholic beverages while at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive, or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your...

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Employee motivation techniques

Employee motivation techniques

By on Jun 10, 2015 in Blog, Performance Management, Reward and Recognition, Supervision | 0 comments

Understanding what motivates your employees will give you added insight as to how to interact with your team when creating action plans. Ongoing recognition creates a positive working environment and increases productivity. Basic gestures that may be used as employee motivation techniques could include: Thank you notes Public recognition Positive reinforcement Movie tickets, taking them to lunch, or other small rewards A requested shift or day off Assigning more responsibility Training on tasks not previously performed Although these motivational gestures are small, they are effective. When giving recognition, remember to be specific, build trust, reward quickly, show sincere appreciation, and thank the employee for their work. Ultimately, your team feeds off of your mood each day. If you are excited about the company and the business, they likely will be too. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Barriers to employee motivation

Barriers to employee motivation

By on Jun 8, 2015 in Blog, Performance Management, Reward and Recognition, Supervision | 0 comments

Time-proven facts note that not every employee can be motivated in the same way. A successful manager will consider this fact as interactions occur each day with employees and customers. You hold the key to the atmosphere within your organization. Motivated employees can do things they never thought possible because of dedication to you and the organization. Initially, you must be aware of internal and external motivation inhibitors in order to minimize the negative impact of each. Internal motivational inhibitors may include: Change Fear of discipline Expectations that are not clearly communicated Fear of failure Boredom/laziness Unachievable goals External motivational inhibitors may include lack or absence of: Recognition Trust Communication Training Appropriate resources Understanding performance expectations Cooperation of other team members A sense of importance Opportunities for advancement or personal development Performance feedback Goals or direction Equitable compensation Once specific inhibitors have been identified, strive to address and minimize them. Please note that money is not the #1 motivator for everyone! Different things will motivate your staff members. It is up to you to discover what motivational triggers apply to each employee. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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