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Why managers avoid dealing with conflict

Why managers avoid dealing with conflict

By on Apr 13, 2016 in Blog, Leadership, Supervision | 0 comments

Many managers are fearful of handling conflict because of perceived negative ramifications in the future. They are afraid that favorable employee relations may never be restored to a positive and productive level. It is not uncommon to become tense just at the thought of becoming involved in workplace conflict. Managers are concerned that if a conflict is not handled properly morale may be reduced, and that additional conflict may result. Frequently, managers just wish the conflict would go away, or look someone to blame. Today’s workers do not want conflicts made public. They fear that complaining could make them appear to be petty and incompetent or insecure and unprofessional. Customers and employees alike can sense tension. A manager must ensure a positive atmosphere in the workplace. As with any performance or Human Resource related situation, a manager’s ability to achieve compromise and build a consensus with the parties involved is essential to an effective resolution. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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The importance of resolving workplace conflict

The importance of resolving workplace conflict

By on Apr 11, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Supervision, Training and Development | 0 comments

It is generally assumed that employees conduct themselves in a professional manner in the workplace.  But, harmonious relationships don’t always exist, and occasionally a “difference of opinion” occurs, resulting in conflict. Here are some effects that can happen when conflict exists in the workplace: Productivity is hindered. Customer satisfaction is compromised. The atmosphere may be tense. An unpleasant environment is created. But conflict is reality. The issue is how to resolve conflict, because conflict can result in: Low productivity Absenteeism High employee turnover Theft Sabotage Litigation High insurance premiums It has been shown that 30% of a manager’s time in the workplace is spent resolving employee conflict. Valuable resources can be saved when a manager knows how to effectively control conflict. Overcoming employee conflict requires a high level of tact and diplomacy and may even necessitate: An intervention Ongoing negotiation Involving an external neutral party As with any performance or Human Resources related situation, a manager’s ability to achieve compromise and build a consensus with the parties involved is essential to an effective resolution. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Defining the three phases of performance management: phase three – termination

Defining the three phases of performance management: phase three – termination

By on Apr 7, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Supervision | 0 comments

After conducting phase one [coaching] and phase two [corrective action] of performance management, it is time to move to the third and final stage of performance management: termination. Termination, or discharge, is the process of removing the employee from their position with the company. When all attempts to improve performance have failed, the position will be vacated in order to make room for a new employee who can fulfill the requirements of the position. Both you and your organization can benefit from the termination, in that poor performers may be separated from the company and workplace morale may improve upon separation of the poor performer. Strive for consistency as you progress through the various stages of performance management. Ensure that all concerns discussed in each of the three phases are directly related to the employee’s performance, in relation to company policies and performance expectations established for the position. Any written corrective action should be reviewed with your manager. Terminations should be reviewed by management, which can include Human Resources and your manager. Your management will provide feedback to ensure fairness and consistency, while protecting the liability of the organization. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Defining the three phases of performance management: phase two – corrective action

Defining the three phases of performance management: phase two – corrective action

By on Apr 5, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Supervision | 0 comments

A few weeks ago, we shared some basics about managing poor performance and how to begin the process of addressing it through coaching. If an employee is still not meeting their position’s expectations after receiving training and coaching from their supervisor, it is time to move to the next step of performance management – corrective action. Corrective action is implemented when an employee has been properly and thoroughly trained, but is not performing according to company and position standards and guidelines. In this instance, it is your responsibility to: Uncover reasons for poor performance Inform the employee of low performance issues Provide guidance to improve the situation A verbal discussion or warning is the initial, informal meeting between you and the employee. A written corrective action calls for a more formal meeting between you and the employee, where pertinent information is documented on a permanent record. Regardless of the type of corrective action being administered, an action plan for problem resolution, with a corresponding time frame, should always be included. Set measurable goals and outcomes. Both you and the employee can benefit from effective corrective action, in that: Employees are made aware of substandard performance Employees are given an opportunity to improve Negative issues may be quickly resolved No surprises occur during the performance review Trust and concern for the employee is demonstrated by you If the employee’s performance has not reached expected standards, according to the action plan and time frame established in the previous corrective action session, it is time to take further action, which may include conducting a second written corrective action or discharging the employee. A second corrective action is the last opportunity for an employee to improve performance before a possible discharge. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

Performance Management – examining basic reasons for poor performance

By on Mar 14, 2016 in Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Supervision, Training and Development | 0 comments

The goal of an effective performance management program is to make the best even better. Prior to the implementation of any stage of performance management, it is important to understand if there are reasons behind an employee’s performance shortcomings. In some instances, there may be an obstacle preventing an employee from being successful. These obstacles may not be within their control. Consider these options as possible reasons for an employee to exhibit poor performance. If the employee says “I don’t know how to do this” – in this instance, the employee is unsure of the necessary steps for completion of a particular task. It could be due to the lack of training, poor quality of training, inadequate training, or poor employee comprehension or retention. This is a training concern and is your responsibility. Your training and coaching will help this employee learn the steps to perform tasks required for the job. If the employee says “Something is getting in my way” – in this instance, the employee is unable to complete a particular task. It could be because an obstacle is preventing them from completing the task. Potential obstacles could include the lack of proper tools or equipment, equipment that does not perform efficiently, or some other demands that interfere with completing the task. This is a supervisory concern. As the manager, your responsibility is to identify the barrier and remove it. If the employee says “I didn’t know these responsibilities were part of my job” – in this instance, the employee is unclear about their job duties. It might be because a thorough explanation of the position’s responsibilities was not provided. This is also a supervisory concern. As the manager, you are responsible for ensuring that employees understand their job responsibilities at the time of hire. If the employee says “I don’t want to do it” – in this instance, the employee demonstrates a lack of motivation regarding the job and has the necessary skills, yet chooses not to perform the required tasks. This is a corrective action concern. You should assess the employee’s motivation level and begin the appropriate steps to ensure improved performance. In each of the previous instances, a different course of action should be...

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Developing your performance review

Developing your performance review

By on Jan 12, 2016 in Blog, Performance Management, Performance Review, Supervision | 0 comments

You may find yourself asking “Why is developing the performance review so significant?”. A performance review can easily have a long-term impact on your employees, so here are some factors to keep in mind when developing your performance review: Perception of job performance. Growth and development. Ability to be motivated to perform job requirements. Capability to be retained. Capacity to modify behavior to achieve desired business results. Salary increases. Future promotions. Careful development is crucial, as a poorly written performance review could result in serious long-term ramifications. Another important part of the performance review development process is your employee’s self-evaluation. The self-evaluation provides an opportunity for your employee to evaluate their performance from a personal perspective. A near consensus of the two review forms should exist if you have provided ongoing coaching and performance feedback throughout the review period. Should differences be anticipated, be prepared to discuss. Observe the following guidelines for effective self-evaluations: Allow sufficient preparation time for each performance review. Distribute a copy of the performance review to each employee before being reviewed. Explain the importance of the self-evaluation process to each employee. Define how performance is evaluated (i.e., exceeds, meets, does not meet expectations). Review performance review form completion steps with each employee. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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