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Reward and Recognition

Evaluating the performance appraisal system for salary planning

Evaluating the performance appraisal system for salary planning

By on Oct 5, 2017 in Blog, Performance Management, Reward and Recognition | 0 comments

In our last post, we recognized that October often marks the beginning of salary budget planning for the next year and shared merit increase expectations for 2018.  We also mentioned that many organizations are moving away from the traditional performance appraisal process to better reward employee performance.  One way to change your performance review system is to focus on having a conversation with your employees about performance.  Some benefits of a conversational review are: Employees’ performance is measured against their achievements, goals, and objectives.  This allows for detailed documenting of performance which can be used to accurately reward the employee. Employers can learn what employees need to succeed.  Together they can discuss what needs to change in the future and managers can help their employees perform to the best of their ability. Employees are given an evaluation beyond just a number.  This is more valuable for improving performance and allows for honesty between the manager and the employee. Employees focus on accomplishing goals when pay is based on goal achievement.  So, if you do edit your performance appraisal system, it is also a good idea to review and update your merit increase practices.  For example, if performance conversations become a regular practice every quarter, it might make sense to adjust merit rewards to a quarterly schedule.  Another potential way to revise merit practices is to offer variable compensation.  Variable pay as a percent of salary can reward performance at every job level and connects compensation to corporate, department, and team goal achievement. If your company is thinking about adjusting their performance review system to increase employee engagement and improve productivity or revise their merit increase system, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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2018 merit and salary increase planning

2018 merit and salary increase planning

By on Oct 3, 2017 in Blog, Reward and Recognition | 0 comments

As the month of October begins, many organizations are getting deeper into their budgeting and planning process for 2018.  One area they are focusing on is merit increase and salary budget planning. Keep this in mind as you make your compensation plans for next year: Most survey data show an average salary budget increase of 3%.  This means that organizations will use 3% as the basis for awarding merit increases based on performance. Further, this is on par with actual 2017 salary increases which were reported at 3%. Most organizations are moving to a focus [versus anniversary] based performance appraisal cycle because it focuses the organization on preparing and delivering performance appraisals at one time which helps ensure they all get completed, and salary increases are applied at one time and it is easier for the organization to budget for them. There has been a lot written about organizations moving away from performance reviews in favor of ongoing coaching conversations.  In theory this is good, but the practical reality is that it is less apt to happen given managers’ other priorities. Consequently, performance is not documented making corrective action, coaching, and possibly terminations, more difficult.   If salary budget planning is new to you or you, now is a good time to think about your process and assess whether you are getting the most out of your merit increase dollars or if your performance appraisal system is as effective as it should be.  If you need assistance with this or other compensation consulting needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Tips on throwing a great holiday party for your employees

Tips on throwing a great holiday party for your employees

By on Dec 7, 2016 in Blog, Communication, Reward and Recognition | 0 comments

With it being the holiday season and end of the year, throwing a holiday party for your employees is a great way to show appreciation for how hard everyone has worked and that you really care about your employees. Here are a few suggested tips from Inc.com on how to throw a great holiday party for your employees this year. Have the party in January – moving the party to January will help you avoid the holiday rush and it will be easier and cheaper to book your venue and find a caterer. Hold the party during working hours and at the office – this option will also save you money from renting a venue and employees don’t have to spend their free time outside of work with co-workers. Throw a potluck – make sure your employees enjoy the idea of a potluck or it could end up being a bust. Another possibility is having the company provide pizza, sandwiches, or any entrée of your choice, and have the employees bring in their favorite sides or desserts. Do something nontraditional – go to the zoo, aquarium, or other local attraction instead of having the traditional holiday party. Don’t exclude spouses/significant others – if you decide to have a Friday night event dinner or party, give your employees the option of a “plus one guest” if appropriate. Don’t charge employees – only throw the type of holiday party that you can afford, whether you order pizza at the office or a fancy dinner at a nice restaurant. Charging your employees will not send them the message that the party is a celebration for their hard work. Provide transportation if alcohol is served – either make arrangements with a taxi company or hire a bus if alcohol will be served at the event. Even though transportation is provided, this does not give employees permission to exhibit behavior that go against company policies and they should still act responsibly. Don’t force people to attend – employees should always have the option to attend a holiday party regardless if it’s at the office or an offsite event. If someone does not want to attend, this is not a sign that they are not a team player and...

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Tips on throwing a great holiday party for your employees

Tips on throwing a great holiday party for your employees

By on Dec 17, 2015 in Blog, Reward and Recognition | 0 comments

With it being the holiday season and end of the year, throwing a holiday party for your employees is a great way to show appreciation for how hard everyone has worked and that you really care about your employees. Here are a few suggested tips from Inc.com on how to throw a great holiday party for your employees this year. Move the party to January – moving the party to January will help you avoid the holiday rush and it will be easier and cheaper to book your venue and find a caterer. Hold the party during working hours and at the office – this option will also save you money from renting a venue and employees don’t have to spend their free time outside of work with co-workers. Throw a potluck – make sure your employees enjoy the idea of a potluck or it could end up being a bust. Another possibility is having the company provide pizza, sandwiches, or any entrée of your choice, and have the employees bring in their favorite sides or desserts. Go somewhere fun instead – go to the zoo, aquarium, or other local attraction instead of having the traditional holiday party. Don’t exclude spouses/significant others – if you decide to have a Friday night event dinner or party, give your employees the option of a “plus one guest” if appropriate. Don’t charge employees – only throw the type of holiday party that you can afford, whether you order pizza at the office or a fancy dinner at a nice restaurant. Charging your employees will not send them the message that the party is a celebration for their hard work. Provide transportation if alcohol is served – either make arrangements with a taxi company or hire a bus if alcohol will be served at the event. Even though transportation is provided, this does not give employees permission to exhibit behavior that go against company policies and they should still act responsibly. Don’t force people to come – employees should always have the option to attend a holiday party regardless if it’s at the office or an offsite event. If someone does not want to attend, this is not a sign that they are...

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Employee motivation techniques

Employee motivation techniques

By on Jun 10, 2015 in Blog, Performance Management, Reward and Recognition, Supervision | 0 comments

Understanding what motivates your employees will give you added insight as to how to interact with your team when creating action plans. Ongoing recognition creates a positive working environment and increases productivity. Basic gestures that may be used as employee motivation techniques could include: Thank you notes Public recognition Positive reinforcement Movie tickets, taking them to lunch, or other small rewards A requested shift or day off Assigning more responsibility Training on tasks not previously performed Although these motivational gestures are small, they are effective. When giving recognition, remember to be specific, build trust, reward quickly, show sincere appreciation, and thank the employee for their work. Ultimately, your team feeds off of your mood each day. If you are excited about the company and the business, they likely will be too. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Barriers to employee motivation

Barriers to employee motivation

By on Jun 8, 2015 in Blog, Performance Management, Reward and Recognition, Supervision | 0 comments

Time-proven facts note that not every employee can be motivated in the same way. A successful manager will consider this fact as interactions occur each day with employees and customers. You hold the key to the atmosphere within your organization. Motivated employees can do things they never thought possible because of dedication to you and the organization. Initially, you must be aware of internal and external motivation inhibitors in order to minimize the negative impact of each. Internal motivational inhibitors may include: Change Fear of discipline Expectations that are not clearly communicated Fear of failure Boredom/laziness Unachievable goals External motivational inhibitors may include lack or absence of: Recognition Trust Communication Training Appropriate resources Understanding performance expectations Cooperation of other team members A sense of importance Opportunities for advancement or personal development Performance feedback Goals or direction Equitable compensation Once specific inhibitors have been identified, strive to address and minimize them. Please note that money is not the #1 motivator for everyone! Different things will motivate your staff members. It is up to you to discover what motivational triggers apply to each employee. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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