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Performance Management

People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

By on Jun 7, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

When we find a client struggling through corrective action, we show them the process to manage performance effectively so that they can make better decisions about performance management outcomes. If they have not done so, we facilitate a discussion of what is expected of the role, both in terms of job duties and expected behaviors. This often helps the client focus on the specific performance issues. Scan their employee handbook and policies and procedures. Often overlooked, the descriptions of what is acceptable and what is not may be found here.  This helps develop a plan to manage performance and hold people accountable. Uncover exactly what the performance issues are. Are they related to failing to meet key performance indicators, sales or production goals?  Are they violating company policies? Do they behave in ways that are not appropriate for their role? Once the client has defined the issue, we then assist with preparing corrective action tools that can be used in coaching, corrective action, or if necessary, termination,  to ensure the process is firm, fair, and consistent. Managing poor performance is a challenge.  It’s often not pleasant, but if you can save a poor performer by learning to address performance issues clearly and thoughtfully when they arise, you’ll strengthen your business. While it may ultimately require the most drastic action such as termination of employment, in most cases effective performance management leads to performance improvement, which saves time and money on recruitment, training, and maintaining employee morale and productivity. Do you have questions about effective performance review systems?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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People problems rarely “work themselves out”

People problems rarely “work themselves out”

By on Jun 5, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

In our Human Resources consulting practice, one of our favorite euphemisms for performance management issues is when a client tells us that they need our help because an employee “isn’t working out”.  Our first response is usually, “well, tell them to go to the gym!”  Kidding aside, we understand what the client means, but use this to get the client to think and speak in more specific terms. Simply put, it’s a serious matter to contemplate terminating someone’s employment, and we want to be sure that the client has thought clearly about their rationale for doing so.  This is where effective performance management can help. When clients tell us someone is “not working out”, that can mean one or more of the following: The employee is failing to meet production, sales, or other specific goals, or isn’t fulfilling the duties enumerated in their job description. The employee has violated company policies such as appearance standards, time and attendance requirements, safety policies, etc. The employee does not behave in a way that is appropriate for their role. They may not demonstrate appropriate customer service, teamwork, leadership, or some other trait that is necessary to do the job. We often find that smaller businesses struggle with addressing performance issues. In many cases they do not act at all, or swing the other way and react disproportionately to the final “straw that broke the camel’s back”…which comes back to haunt them if the former employee takes action against them. Here are the reasons we’ve uncovered why clients don’t act sooner: Conflict avoidant…people don’t like to be confrontational, especially face to face. Fearful of legal action…many of our clients are smaller companies and fear that they will inadvertently do the wrong thing that will get them into costly trouble. Inability to articulate exactly what the performance problem is…sometimes the client just can’t state clearly what the problem is…especially when it is behavioral based. Don’t have a roadmap for the process; clients may not know what to expect or have the tools to start and finish a path of corrective action to improve behavior. Feel like they don’t have time to manage performance…too busy…but the problems persist until something must be done about it....

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The value of the position description

The value of the position description

By on Apr 10, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Position Descriptions | 0 comments

Position descriptions are often neglected or misused within organizations. Sometimes the position description gets filled with too much information, creating an overwhelming document that becomes useless to the employee and manager.  Or, it will be created years ago and then never updated, becoming outdated and not reflecting an employee’s current position.   More importantly, it provides no help to the manager to set expectations through effective communication and coaching. Far from being a piece of administrative paperwork that never sees the light of day, position descriptions help in so many ways: For the employee: Sets clear expectations Shows what is needed to be deemed competent in the role Shows how the employee’s role fits within the organization For the manager: Communicates expectations clearly Creates accountability Provides the basis for training and development activities Assists with performance management Assists with developing appropriate compensation structures Helps focus recruiting and selection efforts As you can see, managers may benefit more than employees from good position descriptions.  From an organizational standpoint, position descriptions are the starting point for your performance management and talent review processes. Do you need help developing your position descriptions or other human resources consulting needs? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Organizational Architecture featured in the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute newsletter

Organizational Architecture featured in the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute newsletter

By on Mar 10, 2017 in Blog, In the News, Performance Management, Recognition, Success Stories | 0 comments

Organizational Architecture is pleased to be part of a recent newsletter published by the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute.  Our article Managing Performance in the Family Business can also be found here on their website. The Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute is an educational membership organization of advisors and business leaders working to support the success of family-owned and closely-held businesses, raise the standards of family business advising, and provide continuity in service across our network. We’re proud to be part of their network of advisors, and grateful for the opportunity to assist family-owned businesses with their workforce strategy challenges. Learn more about Organizational Architecture’s work here and connect with us on social media on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Looking forward to connecting with you!...

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Administering your performance review

Administering your performance review

By on Jan 20, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Review | 0 comments

The overall effectiveness of the performance review discussion can be greatly enhanced if specific guidelines are followed. Below are a few guidelines to consider for administering your performance review: Make an appointment with your employee for conducting the performance review. Choose a private location, with minimal distractions. Strive to minimize interruptions that could jeopardize important discussions. Do not schedule the session near a lunch break or at the end of the work day. Inform your employee that the performance review is a tool for discussing personal and professional growth and designed to improve future performance. The review session should be employee-oriented and include positive feedback, as well as an outline of areas of opportunity if applicable. Allow sufficient time to complete discussions. As the reviewer, remain positive, objectively subjective, and control your emotions. Be prepared to discuss ways to help your employee develop skills and/or modify performance. Be prepared to offer solutions or action plans for areas of opportunity. Be prepared to discuss salary, if applicable. A well-rehearsed performance review delivery is essential to achieve the desired results. Creating and following a discussion flow chart will help ensure a successful performance review discussion. Here is a sample of a performance review discussion flow chart to follow: Warm up – spend a few minutes in casual conversation to relax your employee. Purpose – explain to your employee that actual performance will be evaluated against the responsibilities outlined in their position description and strengths and areas of development will be discussed. Performance Evaluation Ratings – define each of the rating categories. Effectiveness – explain the rating category you have assigned to the items in each area and substantiate your rating with specific examples, where appropriate. Strengths and Areas of Opportunity – outline specifics as appropriate. Resolve Employee Concerns – encourage your employee to discuss and record any comments; answer questions that may arise. Action Plan – discuss a development/career focused action plan with your employee to improve performance and record in the appropriate area on the performance review form. Development and Career Planning – Ensure that your employee is concentrating on an area of opportunity or career development. Determine whether the item is short or long-term and when follow-up will occur....

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Developing your performance review

Developing your performance review

By on Jan 16, 2017 in Blog, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting, Performance Review | 0 comments

You may find yourself asking “Why is developing the performance review so significant?” A performance review can easily have a long-term impact on your employee’s: Perception of job performance. Growth and development. Ability to be motivated to perform job requirements. Capability to be retained. Capacity to modify behavior to achieve desired business results. Salary increases. Future promotions. Careful development is crucial, as a poorly written performance review could result in serious long-term ramifications. Another important part of the performance review development process is your employee’s self-evaluation. The self-evaluation provides an opportunity for your employee to evaluate their performance from a personal perspective. A near consensus of the two review forms should exist if you have provided ongoing coaching and performance feedback throughout the review period. Should differences be anticipated, be prepared to discuss them. Observe the following guidelines for effective self-evaluations: Allow sufficient preparation time for each performance review. Distribute a copy of the performance review to each employee before being reviewed. Explain the importance of the self-evaluation process to each employee. Define how performance is evaluated [i.e., exceeds, meets, does not meet expectations]. Review performance review form completion steps with each employee. Do you have questions about effective performance review systems?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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