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Performance Management Consulting

2020 compensation planning

2020 compensation planning

By on Oct 24, 2019 in Best Practices, Blog, Compensation Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

For most organizations, the fourth quarter is when compensation planning for the following year occurs. To make sure that you stay on track paying your people fairly and competitively, here are some things you should think about when you when you are planning for next year’s compensation budget. What should the merit increase budget be? Setting your merit budget is usually the first step.  A number of consulting organizations conduct surveys through the year and publish results in the autumn to help with compensation planning. Using this information an organization can determine what its overall increase target should be.  Most organizations use a system that rewards higher performers with a higher merit increase amount, while giving little or no increase to poor performers. Do your pay ranges need to be adjusted? If you rely on pay ranges to ensure internal equity and for ease of administration, you need to make sure they still have a relationship to the market. If it has been more than three years, you may want to check how your ranges compare to the market and if adjustments are needed. Are your incentives like commissions and bonuses driving the behaviors and outcomes you desire? If you pay bonuses or commission, how do you know you are getting the outcomes you want? Are they true motivators?  Is the amount of incentive pay appropriate for the job performed? There are many things to consider when paying incentives.  Spending some time analyzing what people are doing and what kinds of results they get is a good place to start when analyzing your incentive compensation plans. Are you rewarding top performers well? While studies have shown that there are so many other factors that determine how engaged employees are and whether they stay other than money, we do know that for top performers this is a key driver for them.  Make sure that top performers are receiving better than average rewards, and that you demonstrate in a tangible way that you value their contributions. Who will ensure that increases and bonuses are being allocated fairly? When it comes to compensation planning and administration, we feel that the best programs grow from a collaboration that includes operations, finance, and human...

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People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

By on Jul 12, 2019 in Best Practices, Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting, Supervision | 0 comments

When we find a client struggling through corrective action, we show them the process to manage performance effectively so that they can make better decisions about performance management outcomes. If they have not done so, we facilitate a discussion of what is expected of the role, both in terms of job duties and expected behaviors. This often helps the client focus on the specific performance issues. Scan their employee handbook and policies and procedures. Often overlooked, the descriptions of what is acceptable and what is not may be found here.  This helps develop a plan to manage performance and hold people accountable. Uncover exactly what the performance issues are. Are they related to failing to meet key performance indicators, sales or production goals?  Are they violating company policies? Do they behave in ways that are not appropriate for their role? Once the client has defined the issue, we then assist with preparing corrective action tools that can be used in coaching, corrective action, or if necessary, termination,  to ensure the process is firm, fair, and consistent. Managing poor performance is a challenge.  It’s often not pleasant, but if you can save a poor performer by learning to address performance issues clearly and thoughtfully when they arise, you’ll strengthen your business. While it may ultimately require the most drastic action such as termination of employment, in most cases effective performance management leads to performance improvement, which saves time and money on recruitment, training, and maintaining employee morale and productivity. Do you have questions about effective performance review systems?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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People problems rarely “work themselves out”

People problems rarely “work themselves out”

By on Jul 10, 2019 in Best Practices, Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting, Supervision | 0 comments

In our Human Resources consulting practice, one of our favorite euphemisms for performance management issues is when a client tells us that they need our help because an employee “isn’t working out”.  Our first response is usually, “well, tell them to go to the gym!”  Kidding aside, we understand what the client means, but use this to get the client to think and speak in more specific terms. Simply put, it’s a serious matter to contemplate terminating someone’s employment, and we want to be sure that the client has thought clearly about their rationale for doing so.  This is where effective performance management can help. When clients tell us someone is “not working out”, that can mean one or more of the following: The employee is failing to meet production, sales, or other specific goals, or isn’t fulfilling the duties enumerated in their job description. The employee has violated company policies such as appearance standards, time and attendance requirements, safety policies, etc. The employee does not behave in a way that is appropriate for their role. They may not demonstrate appropriate customer service, teamwork, leadership, or some other trait that is necessary to do the job. We often find that smaller businesses struggle with addressing performance issues. In many cases they do not act at all, or swing the other way and react disproportionately to the final “straw that broke the camel’s back”…which comes back to haunt them if the former employee takes action against them. Here are the reasons we’ve uncovered why clients don’t act sooner: Conflict avoidant…people don’t like to be confrontational, especially face to face. Fearful of legal action…many of our clients are smaller companies and fear that they will inadvertently do the wrong thing that will get them into costly trouble. Inability to articulate exactly what the performance problem is…sometimes the client just can’t state clearly what the problem is…especially when it is behavioral based. Don’t have a roadmap for the process; clients may not know what to expect or have the tools to start and finish a path of corrective action to improve behavior. Feel like they don’t have time to manage performance…too busy…but the problems persist until something must be done about it....

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We partner with Public Library systems to solve their HR challenges

We partner with Public Library systems to solve their HR challenges

By on Apr 10, 2018 in Best Practices, Blog, Compensation Consulting, Government and Public Sector, HR Consulting, HR Project Management, Performance Management Consulting, Talent Acquisition, Training and Development Consulting, Veteran Owned Small Business | 0 comments

Public libraries have unique challenges. Public sector employment rules and collective bargaining makes the job as library Executive Director or HR leader all the more challenging. Our public library and public sector expertise incorporates data from the American Library Association, regional public library and public employer organizations, and more than TEN YEARS of HR consulting experience with public, private, and not-for-profit organizations. Whether you are a small public library or one of the largest in Ohio, Organizational Architecture is your partner for helping you meet your Human Resources challenges. Our public library clients include: Cuyahoga County Public Library Stark County District Library Westerville Public Library Our public sector commitment is reflected in the certifications we have earned to do public sector work: United States Department of Veterans Affairs Veteran Owned Small Business State of Ohio Veteran Business Enterprise Cuyahoga County Small Business Enterprise City of Cleveland Small Business Enterprise Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District Small Business Enterprise If you need assistance with other HR projects and want to learn more about our human resources consulting, contact us and check out our blog for more...

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People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

By on Jun 7, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

When we find a client struggling through corrective action, we show them the process to manage performance effectively so that they can make better decisions about performance management outcomes. If they have not done so, we facilitate a discussion of what is expected of the role, both in terms of job duties and expected behaviors. This often helps the client focus on the specific performance issues. Scan their employee handbook and policies and procedures. Often overlooked, the descriptions of what is acceptable and what is not may be found here.  This helps develop a plan to manage performance and hold people accountable. Uncover exactly what the performance issues are. Are they related to failing to meet key performance indicators, sales or production goals?  Are they violating company policies? Do they behave in ways that are not appropriate for their role? Once the client has defined the issue, we then assist with preparing corrective action tools that can be used in coaching, corrective action, or if necessary, termination,  to ensure the process is firm, fair, and consistent. Managing poor performance is a challenge.  It’s often not pleasant, but if you can save a poor performer by learning to address performance issues clearly and thoughtfully when they arise, you’ll strengthen your business. While it may ultimately require the most drastic action such as termination of employment, in most cases effective performance management leads to performance improvement, which saves time and money on recruitment, training, and maintaining employee morale and productivity. Do you have questions about effective performance review systems?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

Read More
People problems rarely “work themselves out”

People problems rarely “work themselves out”

By on Jun 5, 2017 in Blog, HR Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

In our Human Resources consulting practice, one of our favorite euphemisms for performance management issues is when a client tells us that they need our help because an employee “isn’t working out”.  Our first response is usually, “well, tell them to go to the gym!”  Kidding aside, we understand what the client means, but use this to get the client to think and speak in more specific terms. Simply put, it’s a serious matter to contemplate terminating someone’s employment, and we want to be sure that the client has thought clearly about their rationale for doing so.  This is where effective performance management can help. When clients tell us someone is “not working out”, that can mean one or more of the following: The employee is failing to meet production, sales, or other specific goals, or isn’t fulfilling the duties enumerated in their job description. The employee has violated company policies such as appearance standards, time and attendance requirements, safety policies, etc. The employee does not behave in a way that is appropriate for their role. They may not demonstrate appropriate customer service, teamwork, leadership, or some other trait that is necessary to do the job. We often find that smaller businesses struggle with addressing performance issues. In many cases they do not act at all, or swing the other way and react disproportionately to the final “straw that broke the camel’s back”…which comes back to haunt them if the former employee takes action against them. Here are the reasons we’ve uncovered why clients don’t act sooner: Conflict avoidant…people don’t like to be confrontational, especially face to face. Fearful of legal action…many of our clients are smaller companies and fear that they will inadvertently do the wrong thing that will get them into costly trouble. Inability to articulate exactly what the performance problem is…sometimes the client just can’t state clearly what the problem is…especially when it is behavioral based. Don’t have a roadmap for the process; clients may not know what to expect or have the tools to start and finish a path of corrective action to improve behavior. Feel like they don’t have time to manage performance…too busy…but the problems persist until something must be done about it....

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