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Leadership

Why managers avoid dealing with conflict

Why managers avoid dealing with conflict

By on Apr 13, 2016 in Blog, Leadership, Supervision | 0 comments

Many managers are fearful of handling conflict because of perceived negative ramifications in the future. They are afraid that favorable employee relations may never be restored to a positive and productive level. It is not uncommon to become tense just at the thought of becoming involved in workplace conflict. Managers are concerned that if a conflict is not handled properly morale may be reduced, and that additional conflict may result. Frequently, managers just wish the conflict would go away, or look someone to blame. Today’s workers do not want conflicts made public. They fear that complaining could make them appear to be petty and incompetent or insecure and unprofessional. Customers and employees alike can sense tension. A manager must ensure a positive atmosphere in the workplace. As with any performance or Human Resource related situation, a manager’s ability to achieve compromise and build a consensus with the parties involved is essential to an effective resolution. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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Tips for a new leader

Tips for a new leader

By on Jul 8, 2015 in Blog, Leadership, Training and Development | 0 comments

Before a new team leader can begin to focus on the team, a self-analysis should be completed to determine readiness for assuming leadership responsibilities. Some factors a team leader should consider when beginning the new role include: Self-esteem – people with high self-esteem are generally success-oriented. High self-esteem in the workplace is essential for a successful team leader. Confidence in yourself and the members of your team will help create an atmosphere of trust and respect. As a team leader, you must also strive to build the self-esteem and self-image of your team members. Realism – it’s important that the team leader always project a professional image. At the same time, it’s equally important to be perceived as “real” by other members of the team. Be willing to admit to your shortcomings. Occasionally, a team member may have a better idea than yours. Team members can offer valuable insight into the decision making process. Attitude and arrogance – new team leaders frequently fall into the trap of giving an impression of arrogance. Having pride in a new leadership position should lead to confidence in your abilities. Remain aware of others who may be skeptical about your leadership skills or credibility. Quietly and subtly demonstrate your confidence rather arrogance. Being committed to achieving team goals and standards will improve your leadership skills and enhance your credibility. Fallibility – Team leaders are not made in a day, and mistakes will be made along the way. They are human too! Mistakes are part of the growth and development process and should be considered learning experiences. A mistake does not lessen your abilities as a leader, as long as a lesson was learned and the mistake is not repeated. Blame should not be passed on for your mistakes. The manner in which you accept responsibility for mistakes sets the standards for your expectations of other team members. Offer assistance and guidance to help your team avoid mistakes. These are just to name a few! There are several other factors that a team leader should consider before beginning a new role as well including opportunities for improvement, succession planning, delegation, workplace bias, role modeling and role playing, determination, and objectivity. Watch for new postings...

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All about leadership

All about leadership

By on Jul 6, 2015 in Blog, Leadership, Training and Development | 0 comments

Leadership is the process of influencing employees to reach common goals. It also involves motivating them to achieve these goals. Plainly said, an excellent leader works with and through employees and is essential for any team to be successful. Did you know there is a difference between being a “manager” and being a “leader”? Take for example a common business occurrence. An individual is responsible for implementing a new plan or process. Generally, a: Manager would focus on monitoring results and comparing them to goals, in addition to correcting any deviation from the plan/goal. Leader would focus on energizing and influencing employees to reach the goal, helping them overcome any hurdles that may arise. Given the same project or plan, the: Manager’s outcomes would be very predictable, and the expected results would be delivered consistently. Leader’s outcomes could likely generate change in the processes, which may result in greater efficiency in the future. Managers are necessary to conduct business in an orderly manner; however, leaders are necessary to create valuable and necessary change. In order to thoroughly understand leadership, it is necessary to understand the relationship between power and leadership. Power is defined as the ability to influence the behavior of others. In most businesses today, five types of power actually exist. Legitimate power – bestowed upon individuals who hold a particular position within a company’s management structure. Coercive power – suggests employee compliance by psychological or emotional threats, existing today only in the form of discipline. Reward power – gives or withholds salary, promotional, or recognition awards. Expert power – bestowed on an individual based on their expertise in a given area. Referent power – bestowed on an individual based on traits such as loyalty or charisma. Even though a manager or leader possesses one or more of the five powers, it may not be necessary to routinely use them. Power should be used as a means to achieve desired team goals, not disguise personal shortcomings or achieve personal agendas. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy here on our blog, as well as Facebook, LinkedIn,...

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