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Best practices

Are you prepared to respond to claims of harassment?

Are you prepared to respond to claims of harassment?

By on Feb 21, 2018 in Best practices, Blog, Compliance, Harassment, Harassment Prevention Assessment, HR Consulting, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Allegations of harassment are all over the news and there are no signs of this national trend letting up anytime soon.  For organizations, there is no better time than now to assess your readiness to prevent or appropriately respond to claims of harassment. Claims of harassment…if not responded to effectively…can have extremely damaging effects on the workplace.  Legal liability can be astronomical.  So can attorney’s fees and rising insurance rates.  And the intangible impact on organizational culture can be just as damaging.  Harassment allegations in the workplace can drive down employee engagement, which can hamper even the best organization’s ability to attract and retain talent. A critical first step to ensuring that your organization is well situated to prevent, respond to, or at the very least defend any claims of harassment that could arise is to conduct an independent and thorough assessment of the efficacy of your harassment prevention efforts. As we announced last week, we have partnered with Sindy Warren of Warren & Associates who is an authority on workplace harassment.   Together we have developed our Harassment Prevention Assessment.  This new service will help you make sure that you are taking the right steps to prevent and respond to claims of harassment in a vigorous manner. We will not only assess your current harassment prevention state of affairs, but also provide you with recommended next steps. Isn’t it worth it to ensure your employees can be safe and productive at work…and keep your organization and reputation respected and valued? Ask us about our Harassment Prevention Assessment and your other Human Resources needs and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Performance review best practices for 2018

Performance review best practices for 2018

By on Jan 30, 2018 in Best practices, Blog, Coaching, Performance Management, Performance Review | 0 comments

The beginning of the new year is well behind us and we are in the thick of the first quarter.  By now, your finance team has done most of the work determining your financial results for 2017, and many companies are getting ready to launch their annual performance review process. While there has been an ongoing debate about whether to do annual reviews, or replace it with a continuous feedback approach, many organizations still follow the annual review process.  There are many reasons for this: the organization already has the tools in place, managers understand the current process, and employees have come to expect it.  We’re not saying the traditional process is perfect…but it can nonetheless add value if done correctly. Here are some tips to make the process go smoothly and more importantly, have meaning. Focus the review period: instead of requiring reviews be done on the employee’s anniversary, schedule the reviews to occur at one time of the year.  This has many benefits: it makes financial planning for increases easier, ensures better compliance because the organization is focused on doing them, and avoids that feeling managers have that they are ‘always doing reviews’. Make it simple: if you’re a manager with ten reviews to conduct, you don’t need a process that will take hours and hours to complete. Don’t overwhelm them with dozens of factors to rate.  And speaking of ratings, limit the number of ratings that can be given so that the distinctions in performance are meaningfully shown. We recommend three- or five-point rating scales. Add some constraints: some managers can barely write two sentences about someone, others can write a novel.  Don’t make them use a format that requires them to write essays.  And if you are using ratings, you should use a tool like MS Excel so that you can not only control the inputs but make the tabulation of the ratings easier. Collect, review, and use the data: after all the effort of conducting reviews, don’t let them disappear into a personnel file never to be seen again.  Take the time to aggregate and review the ratings, both overall and by rated dimension.  This can give you insight into your bench strength and...

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Time to update those required postings!

Time to update those required postings!

By on Jan 9, 2018 in Best practices, Blog, Compliance | 0 comments

With many federal and state laws changing or going into effect on January 1, the notices that alert your employees about important workplace laws and rights should be audited to ensure the most up-to-date posters are being displayed. If you are located in Ohio, you can go here to learn what you are required to post.  Note that this has not been updated to include the 2018 Ohio minimum wage; you can find that here. For federal posting requirements, you can start here to find most of the required posters and links to others you may need. Remember, requirements may vary from employer-to-employer depending on the state in which your employees work, the size of your organization, and the type of industry. These postings should be displayed in a conspicuous place in the workplace for all employees to see, such as a break room, copy room, or other common areas for employees. If your organization has multiple facilities, postings must be displayed in each facility. For employees that work remotely from an office location, these policies and regulations should be sent to the employees, provided in hard copy form, or provided electronically for these employees to access as well. Watch for new postings on workforce strategy or contact us for other helpful...

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Holiday party best practices

Holiday party best practices

By on Dec 6, 2017 in Best practices, Blog, Workplace events | 0 comments

Do you have a memo ready to send out to your employees for an upcoming company holiday party this year? If not, here are some suggestions from the Society of Human Resource Management of what to include in a party memo to send out to your employees. Alcohol – It should go without saying that employees should drink responsibly if alcoholic beverages will be served at the party, but that is not always the case. A system should be implemented to prevent employees from consuming too many alcoholic beverages, such as having someone in charge pass out an allotted amount of drink tickets with employees’ names printed on them. This will help employees limit the amount of drinks they consume and employees cannot give them away to others if they choose not to use them. There should also be a cut-off period where alcohol will no longer be served about an hour before the party ends but make sure that there will be non-alcoholic beverages still available. Make sure to have professional bartenders serve beverages at the party instead of burdening an employee with the risk. Apparel – Make sure to have a set dress code for the party so employees know ahead of time what they can wear and set what will be considered inappropriate attire at the event. Behavior – Communicate with employees that although they are not at work, their behaviors should still conform to what is acceptable in the workplace. This includes using language that would be appropriate for the workplace as well. Gift giving – If gifts will be exchanged at the party, make sure to have a price limit on gifts and that gifts should not be obscene, offensive or of a sexually explicit nature. Impaired driving – To avoid employees driving after consuming alcohol, have your company make arrangements with a taxi firm to be available to transport employees who do not have a designated driver to get home safety. Smoking – Have a rule in place on smoking at the event, whether it prohibits it completely from the event or make sure there is a designated area for employees to go. These are just a few items to communicate to your employees in a Holiday Party...

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