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Human Resources Director search for the Clermont County Public Library

Posted by on Jun 4, 2020 in Blog, Government and Public Sector, Public Libraries, Talent Acquisition | Comments Off on Human Resources Director search for the Clermont County Public Library

Human Resources Director search for the Clermont County Public Library

We are privileged to assist another public library with their recruiting needs. On behalf of our client, the Clermont County Public Library [CCPL] we are seeking exceptional candidates for a new Human Resources Director opening. The Human Resources Director leads the organization’s Human Resources Department and is responsible for the development and implementation of the library’s comprehensive talent management strategy. As the principal people manager, s/he will be the driving force behind the individuals who help realize CCPL’s mission to foster lifelong learning by providing resources that inform, programs that engage and ideas that inspire.

Specifically, the Human Resources Director will assess, set, implement, and achieve long-term Human Resources goals and objectives in the areas of employee relations, performance management, training and development, recruitment, compensation, benefits, compliance, personnel administration and others in alignment with the library’s strategic plan. Also, this person serves as the critical liaison to all CCPL’s staff and managers. In addition, the Human Resources Director is the primary Human Resources business partner to executive leadership.

Position Qualifications:

  • 10 or more years of professional experience in all Human Resources disciplines [employee and labor relations, performance management, training and development, recruitment, compensation, benefits, compliance, personnel administration, etc.] is required.
  • A bachelor’s degree in Human Resources, Business Administration, or a related field is required.
  • A master’s degree is preferred.
  • Experience hiring, training, developing, supervising, and evaluating staff is required.
  • Experience as a Human Resources leader in a medium- to large-size public employer is preferred.
  • Experience with labor relations and collective bargaining is required.
  • Experience with the requirements of transparency and openness in all matters required of public organizations is required.
  • Experience in multi-unit / multi-location management and with distributed workforces is required.
  • Experience building consensus and relationships among business partners, executives, managers, and staff is required.
  • Experience using the internet, social media, networking, employee referrals, job postings, open houses, and virtual job fairs to develop candidate pipelines is required.
  • Experience with capturing metrics and producing various employment-related reports is required.
  • Experience collaborating with and influencing board members or trustees is preferred.
  • Experience working as part of a senior management team is preferred.
  • SHRM-CP/SHRM-SCP or PHR/SPHR certification is preferred.

Position Benefits:

  • Comprehensive healthcare benefits including medical, dental, vision, life, and more.
  • Generous paid time off benefits.
  • Eligibility to participate in the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System [OPERS].

About Our Client:

Clermont County Public Library began library service in 1955, with a bookmobile and a small office as its first facilities. Since then, the library system has expanded to 10 locations, achieving a goal of the Library Board to have a library within fifteen minutes driving time of all Clermont County residents.

To Apply:

To be considered for this position, please submit your resume and a cover letter [including salary requirements] via email to: ryansheehan@oahumanresources.com. No phone calls or faxes will be accepted. No third party candidates please. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

 

It’s our THIRTEENTH anniversary!

Posted by on May 1, 2020 in Anniversary, Blog, Recognition | 0 comments

It’s our THIRTEENTH anniversary!

It’s our THIRTEENTH anniversary today!  We couldn’t have done it without the help of some great people in our corner! Thank you Amanda, Alex, Heather, Cody, Melissa, Ryan, and all the others who have been a part of our success over the years.

And of course, thank you to all of our great CLIENTS…you’re the best!

Client success story – Delaware County District Library

Posted by on Mar 30, 2020 in Blog, Compensation Consulting, Government and Public Sector, Public Libraries, Success Stories | 0 comments

Client success story – Delaware County District Library

We’ve shared the work we have done in the past with public libraries. Our success story for this month highlights our recent project with the Delaware County District Library, located near Columbus, Ohio.

The Delaware County District Library serves as the public information provider for their community, using traditional and innovative technology to encourage curiosity, free inquiry, and lifelong learning in a friendly environment. DCDL and its branches are vibrant centers of activity for residents and visitors in Delaware County. DCDL provides an inviting environment that encourages reading, learning, community discussion, and supports lifelong discovery. They are proud to be recognized for engaging minds, expanding opportunities, and improving the quality of life for Delaware County residents.

Based on compensation benchmarking work we have done for other libraries, DCDL contacted us for assistance in analyzing its compensation program and making recommendations to improve it.

Deputy Director Molly Meyers LaBadie was our project sponsor.  She said:

We contacted OA because we knew they were familiar with the public library landscape in Ohio.  We are a growing system in the central Ohio area that has seen a significant increase in population over the past ten years.  Our residents, businesses, and visitors have a greater demand for the services that a public library system provides. This has led to new branches being built, an increase in staff, and new roles being developed to provide new services.

 

Additionally, we are in a very competitive region for professional library talent.  In order to make sure we have the tools to attract and retain people, we needed to understand how we compared to other systems regionally.

 

OA not only provided us with the data we needed, they shared it with us in a way that was easy for us to understand and use. Apart from the compensation work they performed, they shared additional resources to help us improve our job administration processes.  Throughout the project they provided status reports and met with me and the leadership team to explain their work and provide meaningful recommendations to help us manage our compensation programs.

 

We are working hard to make sure our library provides services that the community needs now.  OA was a great partner on this project and their work will help us achieve this goal for our community.

Public sector employers are one of our specialties.  Whether you are a municipality, agency, or public library system, we can help with your HR programs, including compensation benchmarking and pay structures.

If you need assistance with your compensation programs or other HR consulting needs, contact us and check out other success stories to learn more.

COVID-19 resources

Posted by on Mar 26, 2020 in Blog, Compliance, COVID-19, HR Consulting | 0 comments

COVID-19 resources

We realize you are being inundated with COVID-19 updates from your consultants and other service providers.  Simply for the sake of having a consolidated place to store these resources, we will be saving links to resources so that you can locate them in one place.

Keep in mind your state and/or municipality may have additional mandates. Make sure you check these resources as well.

If you have recommendations for other links, please send them our way.

US DOL Occupational Safety and Health Administration [OSHA] COVID-19 resources

US DOL Wage and Hour Division COVID-19 resources

US DOL WHD paid leave Employee Rights poster

US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission COVID-19 resources

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention resources

We hope you and your loved ones remain safe during this crisis.  If you have questions or need other information, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful resources.

 

 

Employee handbooks and policies and procedures manuals

Posted by on Mar 13, 2020 in Blog, Communication, Compliance, HR Consulting | 0 comments

Employee handbooks and policies and procedures manuals

Spend a little time as an HR professional and sooner or later you are bound to be put in charge of developing or revising an employee handbook. Depending on where you work, it may be referred to as a policy and procedure manual.  Is there a difference? If so, what?

Have you ever seen an employee handbook that was more than fifty pages long? That went into painstaking detail on how to process [not submit] paperwork for a leave of absence?  Provided details about the medical or retirement plan when the plan documents and enrollment materials already do that?  How much of it is even relevant to an employee on a day-in, day-out basis?

Employee handbooks and policies and procedures manuals are not the same thing.  They each have specific uses and are appropriate in different circumstances. But a lot of our clients don’t understand the difference so they include a lot of things in the employee handbook that are better placed in a policies and procedures manual.

The best example we can think of to explain the difference between the two is to think of your car.  In your glovebox [really!] there is an drivers’ manual.  This manual seems long…but it really only provides you what information you need to make your car go, and help you resolve basic issues, like how to fill your washer fluid reservoir, or how to find and use the jack to change a tire.  What the drivers’ manual does not tell you is how to change brake pads, replace struts, or resolve why your ‘Check Engine’ light is illuminated.  That is way too much detail for the typical driver who just needs basic information to operate the car.  All that other stuff is in the shop manual, the place the mechanic goes to make the repair properly.  In other words, the employee handbook is like the drivers’ manual in that it tells employees important information they need to do their job, and the policies and procedures manual is like the shop manual the helps those who manage a process or program can do it completely and consistently.

We recommend that you keep your employee handbook concise and as readable as possible.  Ideally 35 to 45 pages is best.  Details about how to process leaves, expense reports, etc. can be kept in the policies and procedures manual for the people who need to do the actual processing and when employees have specific questions that require a more detailed response.

Bottom line…you should have both an employee handbook and a policies and procedures manual for personnel and other administration activities.  Keeping the manual succinct and oriented to what employees and managers need to do their jobs on daily basis is the right way to go.

Do you need assistance with your workforce strategy or other Human Resources consulting needs? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful resources.

Human Resources Director search for the Clermont County Public Library

Posted by on Feb 17, 2020 in Blog, Government and Public Sector, Openings, Public Libraries, Talent Acquisition | 0 comments

Human Resources Director search for the Clermont County Public Library

We are privileged to assist another public library with their recruiting needs. On behalf of our client, the Clermont County Public Library [CCPL] we are seeking exceptional candidates for a new Human Resources Director opening. The Human Resources Director leads the organization’s Human Resources Department and is responsible for the development and implementation of the library’s comprehensive talent management strategy. As the principal people manager, s/he will be the driving force behind the individuals who help realize CCPL’s mission to foster lifelong learning by providing resources that inform, programs that engage and ideas that inspire.

Specifically, the Human Resources Director will assess, set, implement, and achieve long-term Human Resources goals and objectives in the areas of employee relations, performance management, training and development, recruitment, compensation, benefits, compliance, personnel administration and others in alignment with the library’s strategic plan. Also, this person serves as the critical liaison to all CCPL’s staff and managers. In addition, the Human Resources Director is the primary Human Resources business partner to executive leadership.

Position Qualifications:

  • 10 or more years of professional experience in all Human Resources disciplines [employee and labor relations, performance management, training and development, recruitment, compensation, benefits, compliance, personnel administration, etc.] is required.
  • A bachelor’s degree in Human Resources, Business Administration, or a related field is required.
  • A master’s degree is preferred.
  • Experience hiring, training, developing, supervising, and evaluating staff is required.
  • Experience as a Human Resources leader in a medium- to large-size public employer is preferred.
  • Experience with the requirements of transparency and openness in all matters required of public organizations is required.
  • Experience in multi-unit / multi-location management and with distributed workforces is required.
  • Experience building consensus and relationships among business partners, executives, managers, and staff is required.
  • Experience using the internet, social media, networking, employee referrals, job postings, open houses, and virtual job fairs to develop candidate pipelines is required.
  • Experience with capturing metrics and producing various employment-related reports is required.
  • Experience collaborating with and influencing board members or trustees is preferred.
  • Experience working as part of a senior management team is preferred.
  • SHRM-CP/SHRM-SCP or PHR/SPHR certification is preferred.

Position Benefits:

  • Comprehensive healthcare benefits including medical, dental, vision, life, and more.
  • Generous paid time off benefits.
  • Eligibility to participate in the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System [OPERS].

 About Our Client:

Clermont County Public Library began library service in 1955, with a bookmobile and a small office as its first facilities. Since then, the library system has expanded to 10 locations, achieving a goal of the Library Board to have a library within fifteen minutes driving time of all Clermont County residents.

To Apply:

To be considered for this position, please submit your resume and a cover letter [including salary requirements] via email to: ryansheehan@oahumanresources.com. No phone calls or faxes will be accepted. No third party candidates please. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Client success story – medical device company

Posted by on Feb 12, 2020 in Blog, HR Contractors and HR Consultants, Success Stories, Talent Acquisition | 0 comments

Client success story – medical device company

Did you know we help companies with temporary HR assistance? Last year a healthcare device company here in Northeast Ohio reached out to us when they needed some extra hands-on-deck with their recruiting.

Larger organizations usually have a staff of Human Resources professionals to cover all the bases: employee relations, recruitment, benefits, training, etc.  But just because they are larger doesn’t mean that they aren’t lean…from time-to-time there’s more work than people and they need help.

Our client had a similar need…there were a lot of open positions and they needed the help of a recruiter to help source and screen candidates.  Some of these positions were very industry-specific; others were in different parts of the country.

They told us:

We found we had more openings to fill than we had staff to do it effectively and needed some help. A mutual contact referred OA and we asked for their help.

Within days they were able to present HR professionals who were well-qualified to recruit.  We met with them and selected one to assist us with our recruiting projects. We were pleased with how quickly our consultant got up to speed, learned our business and the roles we needed to fill, and located quality candidates quickly.

In our case it helped that our consultant was experienced and very autonomous. She was able to work independently and provide results.  She frequently checked in with us and was onsite as needed, but for the most part once we gave her an assignment we knew she could handle it completely.

Our consultant Evy Davis started adding value immediately and was able to locate candidates quickly…even for roles the client’s recruiting department had trouble filling.  That’s because we have developed a network of well-qualified consultants who bring expertise in their specialty as well as the ability to work effectively without a lot of client oversight.

Sometimes you just don’t have enough team members to do the job, or you don’t have a particular expertise on staff.  Our temporary HR consultants and contractors can help. Onsite or offsite, performing routine tasks or managing whole projects, OA is your resource for assistance. Contact us and check out other success stories to learn more.

What exactly is an open door policy?

Posted by on Feb 11, 2020 in Best Practices, Blog, Harassment, HR Consulting | 0 comments

What exactly is an open door policy?

Most of us have heard the phrase open door policy in the work environment.  But what exactly does that mean? Or rather what should it mean?

Recently a client shared that although they have used this term before, the reality is they don’t like it.  They felt it was a waste of their time and didn’t do anything to resolve issues.  They even cited a recent business book that advised doing away with open door policies altogether!

We agree that these policies have problems, but we also agree that in most cases, they are ill-defined, have no structure, are not communicated well, and no one knows what their role is…neither managers nor staff.

What is an open door policy?

It depends. Colloquially a manager may say they have an open door policy and encourage people to come talk to them when something is on their mind.  While this seems straightforward, leaving it there leads to a host of problems and soon the manager may want to close that open door and even lock it.

In other places you see something stated in the employee handbook, usually a couple of paragraphs. But again, it rarely goes beyond letting the employees know they should talk to management if they have questions about their jobs. It certainly doesn’t tell them much about the process or provide guidance on how to resolve matters on their own.

A bona fide open door policy is designed to ensure that employees who are having issues at work have an avenue to express them to someone who can do something about it.  It invites and encourages employees to let management know if there are issues so that management can address it.  If an employee chooses not to use the open door policy, then the organization has some defense against claims the employee may make through courts or agencies.

Having said that, the way organizations [mis]manage their open door policy can cause more problems. For example:

  • Managers who have not been trained on responding to open door questions may not know they can acknowledge them without taking immediate action, which allows them to seek guidance and try to uncover other facts.
  • Also, managers may not know that ‘open door’ does not mean they can’t set limits…they may need to limit the amount of time they are available to address open door issues or redirect the discussion to current issues and not previously-discussed issues.
  • Employees have not been told what the open door policy can and cannot do for them, and they may have unrealistic expectations or believe they do not have to be part of the solution.
  • Employees use it as a means to gripe without offering solutions.
  • Some employees fear bringing matters up because they fear how they will be perceived…that they are a complainer or a problem employee.
  • Employees fear retaliation…if managers respond poorly or in a retaliatory way to issues that have been raised, employees will stop sharing them.

Avoiding pitfalls can make your open door policy an effective tool in fostering good employee relations and providing you with a means to uncover issues before they get into courts or agencies.  Here is what we recommend:

  • Develop policies and procedures that explain the role of the manager in the open door process.
  • Provide managers with guidance on how and when to respond, and how to manage the conversations.
  • Communicate the open door policy to employees and make it clear that they have the RIGHT to bring important matters up or ask questions of management about their job.  Also explain that they can go to their supervisor, senior management, or Human Resources…whomever is appropriate, or they feel most comfortable going to.  Additionally, employees need to know they also have a RESPONSIBILITY to raise concerns that are not trivial, and that they will assist in the resolution of the matter in an active fashion.
  • Train managers to understand their role and responsibility in the open door process and what actions they are required to take.  Because many managers are unfamiliar with how an open door discussion should go, we advise role playing as part of the training so that they are comfortable with handling situations effectively.
  • Make sure you follow through.  If an employee brings something up and hears nothing further, they assume their issue is not being addressed.  Make sure you advise people what you are going to do and make them aware that in some cases action may be taken but in the interest of employee privacy they may be able to disclose what actions if any will be taken.

Our experience has shown that a well-managed open door policy ensures important matters are brought up so that they be addressed and can be done so without becoming a burden to management. It goes a long way to improving morale if staff knows they are listened to, and managers know they can successfully resolve employee concerns.

Do you need assistance with your workforce strategy or other Human Resources consulting needs? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful resources.