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Posts by Mark Fiala

OA featured on the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute website

OA featured on the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute website

By on Jun 30, 2017 in Blog, Hiring, In the News, Recognition, Success Stories, Talent Acquisition | 0 comments

Organizational Architecture is pleased to be part of a recent newsletter published by the Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute.  Our article Finding the Right People – Strategies for Recruitment was featured in the newsletter and can also be found on their website. The Galliard Family Business Advisor Institute is an educational membership organization of advisors and business leaders working to support the success of family-owned and closely-held businesses, raise the standards of family business advising, and provide continuity in service across our network. We’re proud to be part of their network of advisors and grateful for the opportunity to assist family-owned businesses with their workforce strategy challenges. Learn more about Organizational Architecture’s work here and connect with us on social media on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter. Looking forward to connecting with...

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OA becomes certified as a Veteran Owned Small Business!

OA becomes certified as a Veteran Owned Small Business!

By on Jun 20, 2017 in Blog, Government and Public Sector, Human Resources Consulting, Recognition, Success Stories, Veteran Owned Small Business | 0 comments

We are pleased to share that Organizational Architecture has been certified as a Veteran Owned Small Business.  This program is part of the US Department of Veteran Affairs and ensures that government set-aside funds are awarded to legitimate firms owned and controlled by Veterans. OA participated in a lengthy verification process over several months.  Besides the recognition of being a Veteran Owned Small Business, this certification will help us reach new clients. It will also give us opportunities to work more closely with government and other public agencies. Want to learn more about us and our human resources consulting services? Contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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Finding the right people is difficult

Finding the right people is difficult

By on Jun 12, 2017 in Blog, Hiring, Talent Acquisition | 0 comments

In our Human Resources consulting practice, one of the problems clients often share with us is the difficulty they have with finding the right people.  Many times, we find only a haphazard process [or no process] behind their recruitment efforts.  Here are some of the things we uncover: Talent acquisition, or recruitment, only happens when a position is open. That is, there is no real engagement with the labor market other than the times they need to fill a position. Candidate sourcing approaches are inconsistent, or the sourcing methods are not the best for the candidate pool they are trying to engage. There is no clear and compelling messaging to candidates about why they should want to work there. No work has been put into defining what is needed and then seeking that out in the candidate pool. In many instances, companies go back to one sourcing approach, for example posting an ad on their website or an internet job board.  Or they rely too much on employee referrals.  Don’t get me wrong…referrals are a great source and you should use them, just be careful about overusing them to the point that your employees don’t bring the breadth of skills needed for today’s jobs. Here are some of the reasons we find for why the recruitment process isn’t working: There’s no process. There isn’t a defined process for determining headcount needs, much less a recruitment strategy.  This can lead to results no better than random…here you would save a lot of time simply flipping a coin when making hiring decisions. Looking for the purple squirrel. The ‘purple squirrel’ or ‘unicorn’ is what recruiters refer to as the mythical candidate that not only has all the characteristics being sought by the hiring manager, but also possesses others that can be contradictory or well beyond the needs of the job.  Think: CNC machinist with a PhD or the executive-level finance leader who will also be the payroll processor. Not being clear on ‘need to have’ versus ‘nice to have’. People may not distinguish between what is mission-critical [required] in a candidate versus what is preferred [nice to have]. Wasting time on the nice-to-haves can divert you from moving on good candidates sooner....

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People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

People problems rarely “work themselves out” …so how do you address them?

By on Jun 7, 2017 in Blog, Human Resources Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

When we find a client struggling through corrective action, we show them the process to manage performance effectively so that they can make better decisions about performance management outcomes. If they have not done so, we facilitate a discussion of what is expected of the role, both in terms of job duties and expected behaviors. This often helps the client focus on the specific performance issues. Scan their employee handbook and policies and procedures. Often overlooked, the descriptions of what is acceptable and what is not may be found here.  This helps develop a plan to manage performance and hold people accountable. Uncover exactly what the performance issues are. Are they related to failing to meet key performance indicators, sales or production goals?  Are they violating company policies? Do they behave in ways that are not appropriate for their role? Once the client has defined the issue, we then assist with preparing corrective action tools that can be used in coaching, corrective action, or if necessary, termination,  to ensure the process is firm, fair, and consistent. Managing poor performance is a challenge.  It’s often not pleasant, but if you can save a poor performer by learning to address performance issues clearly and thoughtfully when they arise, you’ll strengthen your business. While it may ultimately require the most drastic action such as termination of employment, in most cases effective performance management leads to performance improvement, which saves time and money on recruitment, training, and maintaining employee morale and productivity. Do you have questions about effective performance review systems?  If you need assistance with this or other human resource needs, contact us and check out our blog for more helpful...

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People problems rarely “work themselves out”

People problems rarely “work themselves out”

By on Jun 5, 2017 in Blog, Human Resources Consulting, Performance Management, Performance Management Consulting | 0 comments

In our Human Resources consulting practice, one of our favorite euphemisms for performance management issues is when a client tells us that they need our help because an employee “isn’t working out”.  Our first response is usually, “well, tell them to go to the gym!”  Kidding aside, we understand what the client means, but use this to get the client to think and speak in more specific terms. Simply put, it’s a serious matter to contemplate terminating someone’s employment, and we want to be sure that the client has thought clearly about their rationale for doing so.  This is where effective performance management can help. When clients tell us someone is “not working out”, that can mean one or more of the following: The employee is failing to meet production, sales, or other specific goals, or isn’t fulfilling the duties enumerated in their job description. The employee has violated company policies such as appearance standards, time and attendance requirements, safety policies, etc. The employee does not behave in a way that is appropriate for their role. They may not demonstrate appropriate customer service, teamwork, leadership, or some other trait that is necessary to do the job. We often find that smaller businesses struggle with addressing performance issues. In many cases they do not act at all, or swing the other way and react disproportionately to the final “straw that broke the camel’s back”…which comes back to haunt them if the former employee takes action against them. Here are the reasons we’ve uncovered why clients don’t act sooner: Conflict avoidant…people don’t like to be confrontational, especially face to face. Fearful of legal action…many of our clients are smaller companies and fear that they will inadvertently do the wrong thing that will get them into costly trouble. Inability to articulate exactly what the performance problem is…sometimes the client just can’t state clearly what the problem is…especially when it is behavioral based. Don’t have a roadmap for the process; clients may not know what to expect or have the tools to start and finish a path of corrective action to improve behavior. Feel like they don’t have time to manage performance…too busy…but the problems persist until something must be done about it....

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